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FleishmanHillard Earns 2021 PRovoke Global Agency of the Year Finalist Nod

September 30, 2021

ST. LOUIS, September 30, 2021 – FleishmanHillard has been named a finalist for the 2021 PRovoke Global Agency of the Year award. The global public relations and marketing agency is recognized for its impressive business growth and work, commitment to becoming the most inclusive agency and strong thought leadership led by innovative research and intelligence. 

Presented by PRovoke Media, the 2021 Global PR Agencies of the Year finalists are chosen based on an exhaustive research process involving over 500 submissions and virtual meetings with public relations agencies across North America, EMEA, Asia Pacific and Latin America. 

Winners will be announced at the virtual 2021 Global SABRE Awards ceremony on October 27. 

View the complete list of finalists on the PRovoke Media site.

Article

WEBINAR: Is meritocracy a myth? The case for socioeconomic diversity in our working lives

Join us on Thursday 14th October at 1-2pm (BST) for a panel discussion on socioeconomic diversity and inclusion, hosted by Ben Levine, director & partner of FleishmanHillard TRUE Global Intelligence, in conversation with: Sarah Waddington CBE, Co-founder of Socially Mobile Saeed Atcha MBE DL, CEO of Youth Leads UK, Social Mobility Commissioner and Deputy Lieutenant […]

The post WEBINAR: Is meritocracy a myth? The case for socioeconomic diversity in our working lives appeared first on United Kingdom.

Article

Labour Conference 2021 Round-up: Five things we learned

Labour Conference 2021: Starmer slays the Corbyn dragon, but will he now resonate with the public? Four days of Labour Conference is quite enough Conference for most. However, I hugely enjoyed being back amongst party members, MPs, peers and the wider business community for the first in-person Labour Conference since 2019. It’s safe to say […]

The post Labour Conference 2021 Round-up: Five things we learned appeared first on United Kingdom.

Article

The Future of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

September 29, 2021

Diversity, equity and inclusion (DE&I) has risen to the forefront of consumers’ minds as the realities of systemic inequality remain prevalent throughout society. Consumer expectations for brands to be part of the solution and not just the conversation are high.

This year’s Authenticity Gap study, The Power of Authenticity, identifies how organizations can develop stronger relationships both internally and externally. According to the research, nearly 65% of consumers say brands must commit to advancing DE&I in the workplace to be more credible than their peers.  

FleishmanHillard UK’s Christina Peach shares five tips for brands to commit to DE&I efforts and provide solutions to create ongoing, meaningful connections with their audiences.

Discover our consumer expectations Authenticity Gap research and our interactive trend tool.

Article

Better together: The Top 3 collaborations announced at Money20/20 Europe

Last week, after over 500 days of global lockdowns, the annual Money20/20 Europe conference returned. Bringing together more than 4,000 people from over 1,500 companies. The show in Amsterdam once again shaped the future of money. From tiny fintech start-ups to incumbent banking giants, global leaders to innovators and disruptors, they all gathered to meet, […]

The post Better together: The Top 3 collaborations announced at Money20/20 Europe appeared first on United Kingdom.

Article

Communicating corporate responsibility: Corporate responsibility as a negotiation between organisation and stakeholders

September 28, 2021

Richard Costa, Director and Head of Corporate Reporting at Ensemble Studio There is a great deal of ambiguity that shrouds the concept of corporate responsibility. Not only is there a lack of consensus as to what it actually means, more than ever companies are also expected to communicate theirs. It’s a riddle wrapping an enigma. How […]

The post Communicating corporate responsibility: Corporate responsibility as a negotiation between organisation and stakeholders appeared first on United Kingdom.

Article

Inside Labour Business Day 2021: Finding a new normal

September 27, 2021

The party conferences are back and with them the challenge of speaking to multiple audiences – to the party faithful, to the general public and to competing interest groups. But where does business feature in this mix? At Labour Business Day 2021, the party is signalling that it cannot achieve the better future it seeks […]

The post Inside Labour Business Day 2021: Finding a new normal appeared first on United Kingdom.

Article

FleishmanHillard Authenticity Gap webinar with Guardian Columnist, Zoë Williams and Mail on Sunday’s Alex Lawson

September 24, 2021

WEBINAR — The Authenticity Gap: How can businesses do better in a post-pandemic world? FleishmanHillard in conversation with Guardian Columnist, Zoë Williams and Senior City Correspondent at Mail on Sunday, Alex Lawson, Tuesday 5th October 2021 at 12-1pm (BST) Join us for the Authenticity Gap webinar hosted by FleishmanHillard UK’s head of news, Pete Meikle, […]

The post FleishmanHillard Authenticity Gap webinar with Guardian Columnist, Zoë Williams and Mail on Sunday’s Alex Lawson appeared first on United Kingdom.

Article

Communicating corporate responsibility: Corporate responsibility as a strategic activity

September 23, 2021

Richard Costa, Director and Head of Corporate Reporting at Ensemble Studio There is a great deal of ambiguity that shrouds the concept of corporate responsibility. Not only is there a lack of consensus as to what it actually means, more than ever companies are also expected to communicate theirs. It’s a riddle wrapping an enigma. How […]

The post Communicating corporate responsibility: Corporate responsibility as a strategic activity appeared first on United Kingdom.

Article

Being Multilingual: Language as a Bridge Builder

September 22, 2021
By Kara Freeland and Miranda Xie

Approximately 6,500 languages are spoken around the world and, according to The Washington Post, nearly half of the world is bilingual. Yet, those who identify as bilingual and multilingual are often greeted with more challenges in the face of communication, rather than praise. 

As advocates and allies, it is important to look at how we can create inclusive measures for people who are multilingual. Through collaboration, patience and the willingness to understand, we can reimagine different languages not as a barrier, but a bridge builder. 

Colleagues across our Chicago office share their personal experiences as multilingual speakers and how exposure to different languages can make us better communicators and expand our larger, global perspectives. 

I was born and raised in Thailand speaking Thai, so English is my second language. My English lessons began when I was in pre-school. It started by learning the English alphabet and simple vocabulary. 

Growing up, my dad would purchase English encyclopedias, magazines and newspapers for my brother and me to read — or more so to look at – during that time. While I was too young to understand everything then, I was excited to see books that were written in a different language. The desire and curiosity I felt for the books written in English encouraged me to keep learning. Despite my concerns on whether my accent is too strong or if I will stumble on pronunciation, I take every new word and pronunciation I learn as an accomplishment. 

While it comes with a unique set of challenges, being multilingual has opened countless doors to ample opportunities to meet people from all over the world and discover my passion for a career in global communications. I would not have made it this far without support from people who are willing to understand me, even when there were words I cannot pronounce. I am grateful for these opportunities and look forward to creating similar opportunities for others. 

Kara Freeland, senior account executive

I grew up as my mother’s voice. From grocery stores, gas stations, and phone calls, I was often the one speaking on behalf of my mother. She, who I looked up to as my childhood hero, just wasn’t comfortable speaking in English. Both my parents immigrated from China to California before I was born, so I was raised speaking their familial language, while learning to speak English with my friends and classmates.

At home I speak Cantonese, a spoken language that exists in the southern regions of China. My parents also sent me to Chinese School every weekend, where I learned Mandarin, the main native language of China. 

As the honorary interpreter for my parents, I realized at a young age how important connotation can be in conversation. Sometimes the direct translation of a word doesn’t epitomize the meaning, leaving little room for error and the potential to easily steer a conversation the wrong direction. 

Understanding the variety of connotations also allowed me to see the differences between my parents’ perspective of the world as Chinese immigrants and my perspective, an English-speaking, first-generation American citizen. Over time, my interest in communications and public relations stemmed from my bilingual experience. It broadened my point of view and showed me the impact language has on how one speaks, listens and believes.

Miranda Xieassistant account executive

As a first-generation Indian American, I grew up speaking, learning and listening to many different Indian languages at home. While we speak Konkani, pop culture and my parents’ childhoods in Mumbai allowed us to learn Hindi as well. This multilingual foundation was set up even before I started school, with my parents switching from Konkani and Hindi to English in front of me. 

As I grew up, however, I faced second-hand embarrassment of my background and, like most first-generation kids, did the most to make sure I fit in with the rest of the kids at school. This thought process bled into the way I saw my parents, as I often found myself embarrassed whenever they would mispronounce something while ordering food or shying away from their heavy accents in public. I would frequently correct them, looking down on the fact that they were unable to speak what I saw as basic English. I never stopped to think about how incredible it is that my parents, my hardworking, immigrant parents, were able to speak so many different languages, and how my closed perspective contributed to their struggle for acceptance. 

Now as I reflect on my experience, growing up as a multilingual, first-generation daughter of Indian immigrants has taught me to live life with an open mind. Appreciating cultures and different languages is important today more than ever as we have become so interconnected both professionally and across our personal lives. While it may not seem like a big deal for those of us who have grown up in America, inherently balancing different cultures and knowing and understanding multiple languages is something to be proud of and should be celebrated. 

When you encounter someone who didn’t grow up with English as a first language, I encourage you to take a step back and approach them with understanding, instead of jumping at the chance to correct them or target their mispronunciations with judgement. Take the time to appreciate their efforts and who they are as people. 

Shruthika Kamat, assistant account executive  

I was born in Guam and raised in America. I moved to the U.S. when I was almost six years old and consider English to be my first language. My family speaks Ilocano, a dialect of the Philippines, but the main dialect is Tagalog.

When I first moved to the U.S., I was self-conscious about the way I spoke. Sometimes an English word is not pronounced the same when you have a Filipino accent or grow up speaking a dialect of the Philippines. For example, instead of saying futon in our house, it was pronounced “puton.” I constantly compared myself to my peers because I felt like I didn’t speak or write as well as them. I would wait for someone pronounce a word first before I would say it, or dread being called on in class to read aloud because I was afraid of being laughed at. 

To this day, I am still conscious about the way I pronounce things and how they appear on paper. As I grew in my career, I remember being so nervous to write my first press release, my first blog post for a company and even my first professional email. At first, it was discouraging to get edits because my insecurities of growing up mispronouncing my words or not saying the right word would come flooding back. 

Although these feelings resurface occasionally, growing up with exposure to multiple languages has allowed me to connect more with my culture and with my parents. Being multilingual does not mean you are less than, it means you are a better listener, speaker and advocate.

Constructive feedback helps us grow and allows us to keep improving in our craft, though we should also be conscious of the way we deliver this feedback. First, we should take the time to learn about our peers and know that sometimes tenses or pronouns are different in another language. Also, consider asking the person what they meant or to clarify what they were trying to say instead of assuming. By doing so, we can work together on creating spaces for everyone to bring their full selves to work. 

Valerie Del Campo, assistant account executive 

Interested in joining our global business? We want to work with more bridge builders. View our job openings here.