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Article

I Just Need to Be Me: Growing Up Asian in America

May 31, 2021
By John Yu

I have rewritten this post over and over again because I didn’t even know where to start. I figured the best place is the beginning.

My first encounters with racism were so early on that I can’t remember specific instances or moments, but I do recall what I felt. I’ve been internalizing and compartmentalizing these feelings my whole life and have only recently begun to unpack them this past year for a number of reasons, including the recent wave of violence and hate toward the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community.  

Growing up in a predominantly white suburb, I was one of a handful of people of color (POC) at school up until high school. As you might imagine, I was introduced to the construct of race at a very young age. From kids jokingly pulling their eyes back at me to hearing “ching chong” being shouted at me, I was no stranger to the fact that I was unjustly “othered,” just because of my ethnicity and appearance. Looking back, more often than not, the prejudice that I experienced was not so overt. Comments such as, “Where are you from?,” “How do you say XYZ in Chinese?,” “You and (other Asian American kid) look alike” or “You’re Asian so you must be good at math” were commonplace and I didn’t really know the impact of these microaggressions until I was much older.

As a result, I suppressed my cultural identity in an attempt to fit in. For example, I’d go by my middle name (John), disliked Chinese food and even cracked the same racist jokes that were thrown at me. I grew up resenting the fact that I was Chinese and sought to become as “white-washed” as possible because, in my mind, my life would seemingly be easier if I were white. It got to the point where I considered legally changing my first name to John, just so I would be perceived as more American, thus be more accepted.

It wasn’t until college that I found peace with my cultural identity. Having a diverse group of friends with strong connections to their cultures, joining cultural clubs, and taking courses on racism and oppression opened my eyes to an identity that I could call my own. Not just Asian, not just American, but Asian American. I discovered that I don’t have to be white to be accepted. I just need to be me.  

—俞永強

This is my last and first name written in Chinese. In Chinese culture, it is customary for your last or family name to come first, followed by your given name.

Design Process

I attended Chinese school on the weekends growing up, and one of the first things we learned was how to write our names. We had to practice writing our names over and over again until we eventually got it down. I wanted to pay homage to those early Saturday mornings by relearning how to write my name and took it a step further by using a traditional calligraphy pen, Xuan rice paper and Sumi liquid ink.

Once I had a few useable characters, I scanned them and brought them into Illustrator where traced my name and created a vectorized image. The embellishing brush strokes were created using a custom brush in Illustrator. I included the pinyin pronunciation of my name next to each character as well.

Article

The Future of the Multilateral System: Learnings from the Global Solutions Summit

May 28, 2021
By Michael Hartt, Matthew Lowe and Imogen Elliott

With the global community continuing to grapple with impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is no doubt that questions are being asked about whether the multilateral system can not only steer us through the pandemic, but also address other key policy challenges such as climate change, social inequality and trade disruption. […]

The post The Future of the Multilateral System: Learnings from the Global Solutions Summit appeared first on United Kingdom.

Article

How New Mask Guidance Should Impact Your Return-to-Workplace Plans

May 26, 2021
By Sarah Burton

The recently updated guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for fully vaccinated individuals has sparked conversation and controversy, causing employers to take a fresh look at return-to-workplace plans. For employers with in-person operations — or looking to resume in-person — consider the following:

  • Expect employees to hold different opinions. Reports show many workers continue to have serious concerns when it comes to the safety of returning to the workplace. A study conducted by the National Retail Federation and Prosper Insights & Analytics in early May of approximately 8,000 people across industries found that while 48% of people felt comfortable returning to work as long as they were vaccinated, another 35% felt their co-workers needed to be vaccinated to feel safe, 34% reported a need for social distancing and 33% wanted mandatory mask policies.
    At the same time, the updated guidance has sparked concern that unvaccinated individuals may use the guidance to remove masks too, potentially exacerbating the safety concerns of others.
  • Collect input on your employees’ vaccination rate and comfort level. Conduct a survey or consider tracking vaccination rates to inform any safety decisions. Consider the following:
    • Vaccination rate: Reporting on the percentage of vaccinated employees will inform whether new guidance has relevance in your workplace. However, employers should be cautious when requesting such information and limit the inquiry to need-to-know information that will fuel decision-making. Employers should also ensure they maintain confidentiality and, prior to unrolling such an initiative, consult with their legal team.
    • Sentiment on health and safety: Asking employees how they feel about current safety measures should inform — but not be the sole determining factor for — decisions about safety policies and procedures.
  • Adhere to regulations. City and local governments have reacted and will continue to react in different ways throughout the pandemic. Closely follow updates and consult your legal team to ensure any policies you enact are still in compliance with local regulations and employment and labor laws.

COMMUNICATING YOUR APPROACH

According to FleishmanHillard’s latest TRUE Global Intelligence and Talent + Transformation report, “The New Social Contract,” three of the five most important elements of the employee-employer relationship are communication-driven, with “receiving accurate and honest communications” ranking as the top element for employees. Consider the following approaches that embrace accuracy and honesty — and will help drive internal alignment, employee trust and adoption of desired behaviors — as you continue communicating return-to-workplace plans:

  • Strike the appropriate tone. Less restrictive mask guidance has been welcome news to many but raises safety concerns for some. Before planning a celebration, keep in mind that many people are still struggling — physically, mentally, emotionally.
  • Proactively share options. If you decide to mandate vaccinations, U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) laws require employers to provide accommodations for those who cannot be vaccinated for health or religious reasons. Be prepared to communicate how employees can seek accommodation. Conversely, if you drop mask mandates altogether, others may not feel safe coming into work, so consider what options you will provide to address those concerns.
  • Explain policy differences. Whether because of working environment (front-line vs. office-based) or due to differences in local regulations, separate health and safety policies may exist for different employee groups. Communicate policy variances transparently, explaining the need and rationale for targeted approaches. In locations where separate policies may also exist for visitors or customers, provide clarity on how policies impact employees. But use care not to put customer safety above that of employee safety.
  • Communicate other safety and health precautions. While masks are at the forefront of the conversation, they are not the only safety precaution. Provide clarity on how your approach to masks does or does not impact other policies or procedures. Reinforcing why some safety policies remain in place will demonstrate a continued commitment to creating a safe environment for employees, customers, visitors and business partners. This may include testing requirements, social distancing and travel policies, for example.
  • And reinforce why. Whatever precautions your organization takes, continue to communicate the driving reason behind your decisions: protecting and supporting each other and the health of your organization.

Article

FleishmanHillard Study Finds Global Business Decision Makers Support Multilateral Cooperation on Critical Issues, with Corporations Playing an Important Role

More than Four in Five Executives Believe Multilateralism is Effective in Driving Outcomes that are Beneficial to Their Businesses and Solving Global Challenges

ST. LOUIS, May 26, 2021 — As the world continues to grapple with a myriad of issues, from the COVID-19 pandemic to international trade, global business executives overwhelmingly believe multilateral efforts are effective. According to a new survey of 713 business decision makers by FleishmanHillard TRUE Global Intelligence, 74% of leaders globally are confident in the role that corporations play in bolstering international cooperation, but fewer feel that corporations are an essential part of the new multilateralism in partnership with governments (58% confidence) and international organizations (57% confidence).

The survey found a mix of optimism and realism from business leaders in seven major economies: Brazil, China, France, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom and United States. The majority of business decision makers (73%) are confident about economic recovery over the next 24 months, but nearly half (45%) expect geopolitical issues to disrupt business more over the next year than they have in the past 12 months.

FleishmanHillard is the global communications partner for the Global Solutions Summit and is releasing the findings in conjunction with the event that runs May 27- 28. The event will examine the top economic, social, sustainability and technology issues facing the G20. UN Secretary-General António Guterres, World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel are among speakers who will be joined by corporate and NGO leaders.

“For business to invest and drive growth, a stable business environment is needed,” said Mette Grolleman, general manager of FleishmanHillard in Brussels. “Uncertainty leads to reduced investments and lower growth — regionally and globally. Businesses are facing issues that can only be addressed globally. While business leaders are confident in their own company’s abilities, the significance of political leadership and driving a stable business environment cannot be underestimated.”

While business leaders are more confident in their own company’s ability to navigate global issues, the survey found that these leaders feel as strongly as ever about the role they play in international affairs. More than seven in 10 surveyed said corporations should work with and support governments to address global issues (73%). Overall, 65% said they believe the business community should take a leadership role. That sentiment was even higher in China (74%), the UK (71%) and Brazil (70%). At the same time, 71% said direct government intervention is needed on issues like climate change for corporations to thrive.  

Top Issues

The research found the issues that business leaders feel are most important personally — such as human rights and public health — are not the same issues they feel need to be addressed to foster economic growth, which include infrastructure, energy, the environment and trade.

Demonstrating the rising importance of Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) issues for companies and their investors, more than one in three business leaders (36%) feel that ESG criteria currently has a great deal of impact on their business decision making, and most (89%) say that sustainability and the environment is an important issue. Half (52%) believe that each of these ESG pillars should impact their businesses’ go-to-market strategy and decision making today.

Recovery and Disruptions

Global business leaders (73%) are most confident that the ongoing growth and recovery from COVID-19 will take 24 months, and they are equally confident in the ability of a multilateral system to support the recovery. 

Still, they expect COVID-19 to be the most disruptive issue for business over the next 12 months, followed by cybersecurity, supply chain, tax policy and trade disputes. Additionally, three out of four global leaders feel that misinformation is a barrier to corporate success. 

Looking forward, nearly half of leaders (45%) believe that disruptions from such issues will increase over the next 12 months. 

FleishmanHillard will release a full report on the findings of this study in June 2021.

Methodology

TRUE Global Intelligence, the in-house research practice of FleishmanHillard, fielded an online survey in May 2021 among a total of 713 senior leaders of global companies responsible for making strategic decisions in the following markets: Brazil (n= 103), China (n= 103), France (n= 102), Germany (n= 100), Italy (n= 105), UK (n= 100) and U.S. (n=100). The margin of error is =/- 3.57%.

About FleishmanHillard
FleishmanHillard specializes in public relations, reputation management, public affairs, brand marketing, digital strategy, social engagement and content strategy. FleishmanHillard was named 2020 Campaign Global PR Agency of the Year; 2019 PRWeek U.S. Outstanding Large Agency; 2019 Holmes Report North America Large Agency of the Year; ICCO Network of the Year – Americas 2017-2020; PRovoke Media Greater China Consultancy of the Year 2020; PRWeek UK Best Places to Work 2020; Human Rights Campaign Best Places to Work for LGBTQ Equality 2018-2020; and NAFE’s “Top Companies for Executive Women” 2010-2020. The firm’s award-winning work is widely heralded, including at the Cannes International Festival of Creativity. FleishmanHillard is part of Omnicom Public Relations Group and has 80 offices in more than 30 countries, plus affiliates in 50 countries.

About Omnicom Public Relations Group
Omnicom Public Relations Group is a global collective of three of the top global public relations agencies worldwide and specialist agencies in areas including public affairs, marketing to women, global health strategy and corporate social responsibility. It encompasses more than 6,300 public relations professionals in more than 370 offices worldwide who provide their expertise to companies, government agencies, NGOs and nonprofits across a wide range of industries. Omnicom Public Relations Group delivers for clients through a relentless focus on talent, continuous pursuit of innovation and a culture steeped in collaboration. Omnicom Public Relations Group is part of the DAS Group of Companies, a division of Omnicom Group Inc. (NYSE: OMC) that includes more than 200 companies in a wide range of marketing disciplines including advertising, public relations, healthcare, customer relationship management, events, promotional marketing, branding and research.

Article

PRCA Americas Conference 2021 — Post-Pandemic Public Relations: From Crisis to Opportunity

When: Tuesday, June 1 to Wednesday, June 2; Keynote session is on June 2 at 1:05 p.m. BST

Where: Online event

Register for the virtual PRCA Americas Conference here.

The PRCA Americas Conference will virtually gather communications leaders, innovators and influencers across North and South America to discuss post-pandemic public relations. Speakers will analyze how organizations can build trust and prioritize environmental social governance as we endure COVID-19 and societal unrest. These issues further affirm the need for organizations to develop and foster meaningful, two-way relationships with stakeholders.

Michael Moroney, a Public Affairs leader in FleishmanHillard’s Washington, D.C. office, will deliver the opening keynote presentation on “Taking a Stand: Post-Pandemic Expectations for CEO Communications” during Day 2 of the conference. Moroney currently oversees the agency’s global public affairs and public sector-focused work with client Cisco, as well the firm’s beltway-focused work with client General Motors. His leadership on multiple accounts has culminated in numerous award-winning campaigns.

Register for the virtual conference here.

Article

Global Solutions Summit 2021

May 24, 2021

When: Thursday, May 27 to Friday, May 28; Specific session times:

  • Towards a Strong G20 for Effective Multilateral Cooperation session is on May 27, 3 p.m. CEST
  • Digital Divides — Preventing Rising Inequalities in the Digital Age session is on May 28, 3 p.m. CEST
  • Reducing Inequalities and Vulnerabilities in a Post-Pandemic World session is on May 28, 4:30 p.m. CEST
  • Health Investments for Social and Economic Prosperity session is on May 28, 5 p.m. CEST

Where: Online event

Register for the virtual Global Solutions Summit here.

The Global Solutions Summit 2021 will bring top researchers, policymakers, leaders and representatives together to solve global societal, environmental and sustainability problems in a post-COVID-19 world. Realignment topic areas include Systemic, Governance, Ecological, Social, Economic and Technological.

As part of the Governance Realignment track, Mette Grolleman, general manager of FleishmanHillard in the European Union, will join other panelists to discuss the role of the G20 among global organizations, how the G20 can drive transformational change, and how multilateral cooperation can be strengthened through public support, continuity and efficiencies.

FleishmanHillard Germany’s Stefanie Söhnchen will moderate this Technological Realignment panel focused on the various digital divides and policies to narrow them.

As part of the Social Realignment track, FleishmanHillard Germany’s Sebastian Schwark will moderate this discussion focused on eliminating societal inequalities in a post-COVID-19 world.

Nadine Dusberger, head of FleishmanHillard’s Germany’s Healthcare sector, will moderate this Social Realignment conversation on the connection between economic prosperity and public health. The panelists will discuss opportunities to prioritize health for economic prosperity and outline ways to measure the impact of healthcare investments.

Learn more about and register for the summit here.

Article

The Importance of Embracing Your Authentic Self

May 20, 2021

Fear. Anger. Sadness. Grief. Denial. These were the emotions that have been flooding my body for the past few months as I continued to watch and hear stories about the rise of anti-Asian hate crimes across the country. It felt like each day there was a new case being investigated with no hope or end in sight. The more I kept thinking about the attacks, the more I was reminded of my childhood and the trauma that took so long to suppress. When I looked in the mirror, I would see my younger self — a scared Asian boy who believed that if he did everything he could to fit in, he would not have to worry about feeling like an outcast. 

Little did I know that no matter how hard I tried, there was no turning away from my identity. The issue wasn’t about me believing that I needed to act a certain way. It’s that as a society we have allowed systemic racism to influence our behaviors. Instead of working together to fight racial injustice, racism is perpetuated by the acts of violence toward marginalized communities.

I still remember reading the story of Angelo Quinto’s death. He was a 30-year-old Filipino Navy veteran in Antioch, Calif. who died from complications after a police officer knelt on his neck. The incident occurred during a police intervention while Angelo was suffering from a mental health crisis. As I watched the horrifying video, I could feel these waves of emotions rushing through my mind as I kept thinking to myself, “that could’ve been me.”

According to Angelo’s mother Cassandra, her son pleaded to the officers saying, “Please don’t kill me. Please don’t kill me.” When you hear those words uttered by another human being, you would think your immediate action would be to stop what you are doing. For the days and weeks that followed, I kept thinking about Angelo’s death questioning why that same technique that killed George Floyd almost a year ago was used on another helpless victim.

As the countless acts of anti-Asian violence continued, I couldn’t help but to feel defeated. On top of that, the news of the mass shootings that occurred at three Atlanta spas on March 16 only compounded that feeling of defeat. According to a national report by Stop AAPI Hate, there were nearly 3,800 anti-Asian hate incidents reported in the past year. What’s worse is that the hate crimes reported represent only a fraction of the number of incidents that actually occurred.

While processing my emotions, I realized that feeling helpless wasn’t the solution to the problem. Instead, it was a reminder that we should not have to keep our heads down and hide in the shadows. If we expect progress to be made, we must fight not only for ourselves, but for those who are not seen or heard.

During Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month, I am reminded of the many contributions and influence that the Asian community has had on the history, culture and achievements of our country. As a proud gay Filipino American, I am even more empowered to continue to embrace my identity and live a life where I can be my authentic self.

Article

FleishmanHillard Announces New Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Leaders

May 19, 2021

Agency Releases Progress Toward 2021 Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Goals

ST. LOUIS, May 19, 2021 — FleishmanHillard today announced five newly created roles and appointments in its Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DE&I) office, along with its first-quarter DE&I progress. The new DE&I team will be responsible for accelerating the agency’s progress and widening the breadth of perspectives.

The appointments join Leela Stake (she/her) and Adiya Mobley (she/her), co-leads of True MOSAIC, the agency’s DE&I client practice. They include:

  • Rachel Coleman (she/her), DE&I director, FleishmanHillard in Chicago.
    Coleman is a former DE&I champion for the agency’s Chicago office who will manage several of FleishmanHillard’s transformation initiatives and share those learnings and best practices with DE&I counselors to adopt and apply for client counsel.
  • John Soriano (he/him), DE&I director, FleishmanHillard in Los Angeles.
    Soriano has worked closely with DE&I champions across offices for the past several years and will now support the global scaling and development of a culture of DE&I in FleishmanHillard offices around the world. In this role, he’ll work closely with the agency’s DE&I champions to support, highlight and incubate new DE&I initiatives and experiences.
  • Francesca Weems (she/her), DE&I director, FleishmanHillard in San Francisco.
    Weems leads the DE&I committee and fellowship program in the agency’s San Francisco office, along with shaping our clients’ executive visibility platforms. DE&I leadership runs through her and, as such, she will steer FleishmanHillard in shaping its global DE&I strategy, perspectives on key DE&I topics and thought leadership.
  • Chavonne Jones (she/her), DE&I storytelling managing editor, FleishmanHillard in New York.
    Jones is a storyteller and media relations expert whose ability to craft the narrative and get attention on the stories that matter is unmatched. She will step into the role of managing editor for FHPerspectives, weaving a central strategy and looking for storytelling opportunities across the agency’s global network and DE&I work.
  • Cheyenne Cameron-Pruitt (she/her), DE&I program manager, FleishmanHillard in Sacramento. Cameron-Pruittis a DE&I champion for FleishmanHillard Sacramento, fellow mentor and an originator of Remix Your Algorithm, a program to help broaden individuals’ perspectives. She will serve as the storytelling project manager.

“As FleishmanHillard moves DE&I to the center of our business, we’ve identified key roles within our organization to help ensure continued DE&I momentum and accountability,” said Adrianne C. Smith (she/her), chief diversity and inclusion officer, FleishmanHillard. “This group will help us stay focused on our ambition, support the advancement of the agency’s DE&I progress and help us better serve our clients.”

In February FleishmanHillard announced an ambitious DE&I plan to put DE&I at the center of the agency and mobilize its community. To begin the plan’s activation during the first quarter of 2021, FleishmanHillard has:

  • Hired diverse colleagues for 40% of open positions (as designated by “Race” in the United States EEO data) 
  • Developed a DE&I Taskforce, comprising 17 leaders representing all regions, that supports and guides its DE&I work
  • Incorporated 110+ colleagues into True MOSAIC
  • Counseled 85+ clients on DE&I journeys through True MOSAIC
  • Hosted six internal #LosetheWhisper sessions to share and learn about other perspectives
  • Conducted Unconscious Bias and Inclusive Leadership training for 370 colleagues this year
  • Contributed 24,400+ hours of pro bono service, the equivalent of more than $5.1 million in fees, to its communities through FH4Inclusion since its launch in 2016
  • Earned recognition from the Human Rights Campaign as a 2020 Best Places to Work for LGBTQ Equality and was named one of the 2020+ Top Companies for Executive Women by Working Mother Media, representing the 12th consecutive time the agency has been selected to the “Top Companies for Executive Women” list, and the sixth consecutive time the agency has ranked in the Top 10

“We will continue to measure and assess the progress of our DE&I journey, staying true to our commitment to our people, business and communities to become the most inclusive agency in the world,” Smith said. “There is still a lot of work to be done, but as FleishmanHillard celebrates its 75th year, now is the moment to stand up and commit to the agency we’re going to be for the next 75.”

About FleishmanHillard
FleishmanHillard specializes in public relations, reputation management, public affairs, brand marketing, digital strategy, social engagement and content strategy. FleishmanHillard was named 2020 Campaign Global PR Agency of the Year; 2019 PRWeek U.S. Outstanding Large Agency; 2019 Holmes Report North America Large Agency of the Year; ICCO Network of the Year — Americas 2017-2020; PRovoke Media Greater China Consultancy of the Year 2020; PRWeek UK Best Places to Work 2020; Human Rights Campaign Best Places to Work for LGBTQ Equality 2018-2020; and NAFE’s “Top Companies for Executive Women” 2010-2020. The firm’s award-winning work is widely heralded, including at the Cannes International Festival of Creativity. FleishmanHillard is part of Omnicom Public Relations Group and has 80 offices in more than 30 countries, plus affiliates in 50 countries.

About Omnicom Public Relations Group
Omnicom Public Relations Group is a global collective of three of the top global public relations agencies worldwide and specialist agencies in areas including public affairs, marketing to women, global health strategy and corporate social responsibility. It encompasses more than 6,300 public relations professionals in more than 370 offices worldwide who provide their expertise to companies, government agencies, NGOs and nonprofits across a wide range of industries. Omnicom Public Relations Group delivers for clients through a relentless focus on talent, continuous pursuit of innovation and a culture steeped in collaboration. Omnicom Public Relations Group is part of the DAS Group of Companies, a division of Omnicom Group Inc. (NYSE: OMC) that includes more than 200 companies in a wide range of marketing disciplines including advertising, public relations, healthcare, customer relationship management, events, promotional marketing, branding and research. ​

Article

Ten Leadership Lessons to Live by

May 17, 2021
By Zack Kavanaugh

The past year has given us no shortage of lessons in leadership … the good, the bad, the ugly and everything in between. That’s because difficult times shine a spotlight on the impact leaders can have on an organization and many employees have experienced this firsthand (for better or for worse).

FleishmanHillard’s latest TRUE Global Intelligence and Talent + Transformation report, “The New Social Contract,” states nearly twice as many very satisfied employees say they work for leaders who mean and say what they do.

As many employees continue to recover from an emotionally, mentally and physically exhausting year, corporate leaders have a new opportunity to set a standard of authenticity and drive trust with their workforce through their words and actions. To ensure you’re practicing authentic leadership in the workplace, consider incorporating the following guidance into your daily routine.

1. Be self-aware.

Start with YOU. Self-awareness, or “knowing thyself” as Socrates would say, forms the foundation of authentic leadership, and high self-awareness leads to better team performance. To enhance self-awareness, consider setting aside time each day to reflect, get mindful or simply take a break from your typical responsibilities. Think deeply about the role you play at your company, as well as the impact you have on those around you. 

2. Live company values.

Nearly twice as many very satisfied employees say they work for a purpose-driven organization with a set of defined values when compared with the average employee. Leaders play a fundamental role in driving employees’ adoption of company values, so it’s important you embrace and embody them — rather than merely displaying them on company walls or adding to email signatures. Ritualize these values, make them a part of each day and ensure your employees know and understand your commitment to living them.

3. Cultivate inclusion.

What leaders say and do makes up to a 70% difference in whether an individual reports feeling included. At a time when employees long for connection, leaders have an opportunity to open the lines of communication, celebrate diversity and build a culture of belonging among their employees. Inclusive teams have been shown to outperform less inclusive teams by 50%, on average. Welcome all backgrounds, perspectives and ways of working to drive innovation and creativity, as well as to establish employee trust with leadership and among each other.

4. Show empathy.

As employees continue to navigate a changing landscape, be patient, provide reassurance and make an effort to understand their perspectives. Everyone is dealing with many different emotions right now. Simply checking in with employees, getting to know them and paying attention to their needs are great places to start. Ongoing and thoughtful interactions like these make leaders more approachable to employees.

5. Empower others.

Bringing out the best in your employees should be at the forefront of every decision you make as a leader. Fifty-five percent of employees say having a manager who cares about them and is committed to their success is very important. And, when empowerment is high, 67% of employees are willing to give extra effort — but only 4% when empowerment is low. Empowering others may mean allowing your employees to take the lead on a project you’d typically manage or finding other ways to boost their confidence. Showing that everyone plays an important role, from the lowest to highest levels of hierarchy, is a core tenet of a healthy, productive team.

6. Be present.

Today’s circumstances demand more time and effort from all of us and that’s especially true for those managing others. Being present in the workplace — wherever that may be — can be even more difficult for leaders. Adapting to ongoing business changes, balancing competing work-life priorities and managing a never-ending influx of notifications makes staying present difficult. Even so, small practices you adopt can result in big wins. Set a few non-negotiable rules around the daily distractions you encounter. For example, don’t check email or phone messages during 1:1 or team meetings to give each employee the attention and respect they deserve. Employees are watching; they know when you’re actively engaged. Fail to be present and you risk encouraging employees to do the same.

7. Send feedback.

Authentic leaders admit they don’t know everything, but they do know the importance of their employees’ knowledge, experience and feedback. Employees want to feel heard, and 93% say a formal way to give feedback would be helpful or is a must-have. By actively seeking feedback, leaders show their faith and confidence in employees’ thoughts, opinions and abilities — helping to ensure they feel valued. This also offers leaders a chance to be vulnerable and involve employees in the problem-solving and decision-making process. Whether they take you up on it or not, employees appreciate being asked, and they will pay you back through deepened trust … but only if you act on the feedback you receive. By continually seeking and listening to feedback, you also create a dialogue around what success looks like on your team and cultivate a culture where failure isn’t feared — thus encouraging employees to seek new, innovative ways of thinking, working and collaborating. 

8. Express gratitude.

Today, employees are expected to go above and beyond for their employer, but aren’t always rewarded for doing so. Externally, they’re overwhelmed by a turbulent environment. Internally, they may be underwhelmed by a lack of connection and support. Expressing gratitude has been shown to boost employee productivity, retention, job satisfaction, and physical and mental health. And when employees were asked what they would love to hear more at work, a simple “thank you” topped the list. Who should that thank you come from? A manager or executive, according to 70% of employees. Show your gratitude every day. Stop to reflect on those who have really made a difference for you at work — then tell or show them how much that meant to you.

9. Stay humble.

Authentic leaders prioritize their people, leading with the team’s best interests and avoiding placing themselves above those around them. Show your team you’re not just the boss, but a colleague, too, with the goal to serve the people who make the company run. Leaders often put business results ahead of their employees’ needs — and ironically make it more difficult to achieve desired bottom-line outcomes. When leaders are humble and respectful, lead with a people-first approach, and prioritize serving employees, the potential benefits — to both your company’s bottom-line and culture — are limitless.

10. Repeat.

Whether you believe that leaders are born or made, you likely agree that to be successful, authentic leaders must take the right actions and model the correct behaviors again and again … and again. As Socrates so succinctly put it, “to be is to do.” Every day, leaders should strive to lead by example, transforming actions and behaviors into resolute habits. Hold yourself accountable. Set calendar reminders, tack sticky notes to your desk, record your progress, ask colleagues for help and guidance. Whatever steps you take, strive for authentic leadership every day and in every action. The practice of authentic leadership is a continual, never-ending process. You restart daily but the small tweaks you make each day can result in major changes over time. The positive changes you make improve how you think, act and carry yourself in the workplace and they encourage your employees to do the same.

Article

In Conversation with Fiona Harvey, Environment Journalist at The Guardian

May 14, 2021

FleishmanHillard UK Online Event: In Conversation With…Fiona Harvey, Environment Journalist at The Guardian, Monday, May 24, 2021, at 2 p.m. (BST)

Join FleishmanHillard for an exclusive conversation with Fiona Harvey looking ahead to various upcoming environmental meetings, their impact they have on policy and business, and what to expect at COP26. […]

The post FleishmanHillard in conversation with Fiona Harvey, Environment Journalist at The Guardian appeared first on United Kingdom.